Monday, November 15, 2010

In that Moment of For Colored Girls, Press Reset
Where do I begin? Perhaps, I should wait until the emotional marinating is complete? The feelings are raw. Yet to be flavored with my tamed power of the edit. The pain I felt, feel – as I watched and think about the tragedy of life. Will this -what I am about to write- do any justice to Tyler Perry's best form of creativity? Should I even try to communicate where the characters left me?

In this place, I shall be what I am. A man. That man...the man in character after character. The man I saw in Sunday night cinema. The pain conveyed by all. Both male and female. A pain so intense all of it seared my soul. Burned me! Reminded me of what I was, what I am, what I can be, and what I want to be...with and without Whoopi Goldberg character's dependency, Religion.

In this place, I shall be what I am. A man. That man many want to believe is stereotyped entirely too much. The Black man. But, I ask the feared creature: Have you been the abusive drunk in any form? With or without Heineken, Captain Morgan, Ciroc, and/or Hennessey. Have you been the slick rapist in any form? With or without committing the brutality of physical rape. Have you been that inconsistent, come and go Frank in any form? With or without a woman singing, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5gFAiPJhvI.  Have you been that Down Low Brother in any form? With or without embracing homosexuality completely. Have you been the cheap thrill man used for meaningless sex in any form? With or without accepting your devalued role. Have you been that man who encouraged the back alley murder of the unborn by saying nothing or not being available in any form? And, finally, have you been that Noble man – the man God created - that expressed love in the face of not getting what he wanted (a baby) - again, in any form?

Have you?

If you are a man and you answered yes to any of the above you are the stereotype. You have in fact made what was/is thought to be real. You did it, not Tyler Perry. Not the White Man. You are the maker of what is thought of you. If you have responded with a guilty, and not an angry, demeanor you are getting Tyler's unoriginal message.

If you are female and reading, do you remember Phylicia Rashad’s character saying with such authority - before she pulled back the curtains (so fitting; pulling back what has been covered: the light, the truth), "You have to take some responsibility in this." Do you remember that, my essence of beauty? Do you? Yes...you remember. Did that moment take you back to that place? You are/were in that place if you are/were living to get a man - and not living to rid yourself of human-made victimization.

Location, location, location...that is the saying for all those wanting to be successful. It is all about where you are! Will the business survive in this place? Better yet, will the business of God's shattered masterpiece (you) survive in your lonely locale?

We are where we are. We are where we want to be. If not...why haven't we relocated spiritually, mentally, and emotionally? Why haven’t we pressed reset?

Because...we are not free! Because we hide self from truth. Because we are not breathing...as Kimberly Elise’s character did in that ragged chair. She breathed!

We must...breathe easy. If not, we shall be what we are. You, me a serial spirit killing male and you a broken and defeated female.

Tyler Perry's, For Colored Girls has told us

We Are More Than That!

Rise up...God's Mighty People...Rise up!

Muata Nowe

In honor of my momma and your momma if she has endured the pain that being (♀) brings forth.

15 comments:

Michael said...

Wow - I actually agree with that. I had this fierce FB debate with this woman who bashed every male and said we brought on the stereotypes that were portrayed in the movie. But she did that in a way that made every woman the victim, and every male the predator. She was so sad (in my eyes) because of some really serious past hurts she had experienced. And she truly refused to breathe. Thanks for the commentary. I always have said we need to take a shared responsibility, or else we will all fail.

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

I thought it was an excellent movie. The acting was superb. I am not an emotional person, but a deep sense of sadness overwhelmed me for several days after seeing the movie. I did not personally identify with any of the storylines, but I am aware of their realities. That said, I do not plan to attend any more black movies that highlight the negativity in our communities until I see equal numbers of positive, up[lifting movies. I I did not feel any sense of encouragement during or after the movie. My brother refused to go with his wife because he said he didn't want to see anymore black male bashing. Yes, there was one positive male, but in general the men were all negative and the women all naive fools. Positive black movies and television series rarely do well. They don't receive the large audiences from black people that Tyler Perry's movies receive. I am a Tyler Perry fan and I am happy to see him achieving, but I'd like to have additional dramatic, Oscar quality choices that portray the life I and my family and friends live. We all have our trials in life, but this message felt as though life is perpetually devastating for black folks. If a Colored Girls Part Two comes out showing that both the men and women have learned lessons, turned their lives around, and moved forward in a positive direction, I will return. Otherwise, I'm done.

-DW

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Muata responds to DW:

I feel you on this. I wanted to get up and leave several times. More positivity would be a treat!

I do believe that black men and women should be reminded of the mess we cause.


-Muata

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

Wow!! Haven’t seen it yet and you have already heightened by anxiousness and my awareness! I’m going tomorrow and ready for it!!!!

-TB

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

DAMN. Can I share this on my FB?

-SD

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

DW responds to Muata:

white men and women have it all in their play and movie genres - the positive and the negative. that's what i want - i want it all.

-DW

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

This was refreshing to read. Very insightful.

-MH

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

thank you for sharing.... i like this...very powerful.. i am going to link this to FB...

TW

JonesyATL said...

I haven't seen the movie - and you've preach a different perspective than most I've heard. One that I agree with in theory. The men I've talked with that took COMPLETE offense to the movie's message also have a good point - - why do the box office hits featuring an all black cast/storyline have to demonize black men. Why couldn't Tyler's movie include a Caucasian male or Hispanic male? They have been/are just as guilty of the same accusations? Why did Tyler - a black man - choose to perpetuate the demonization of the black man? Why couldn't it be just the story of the man instead of the story of the BLACK man?

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

@JonesyATL

I can appreciate Tyler's perspective. It is his. It is his spin on how the male species is highjacked. That perspective happens to be a black one. All of his movies come from that disposition.

I was not offended at all because I could relate to a few of the characters, both male and female.

If only we just take the movie for what it is...it is a true depiction of horrific behavior.

It definitely is an opportunity to get a lesson. A reminder of where the black race is: We sick.

In my analysis of the movie and the comments related, I do not include white people in that analysis. I see black because black men are recking havoc on their community.

-Muata

JonesyATL said...

Yeah...i agree it's a true story for many relationships. I just choose not to support it or his tomfoolery TBS shows. I'd rather not pay money or support a person who chooses to portray our race in such a bottom feeding victim state.

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Blacks are the cause for the portrayal. Some of us act like damn fools. A lot of us! We need to stop acting like the Niggers that THEY made! Look at us...

Muata

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Resoponse:

Wow!......BP. Reading THESE words “Praise Him” from you. Brought tears to my eyes.

FAITH is something isn’t it? You CAN’T see, but you have the FAITH that things will happen as you not only want them, but NEED them

Hopeful you had a wonderful Thanksgiving.

Peace and Blessings
NJ

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

That was beautiful and very deep and poignant. It makes you think. How many men call this man bashing and won't go to see the movie. No it's not man bashing. It's life for many people, not all, but many. Tyler Perry has out done himself with this work of art (finally). He had to get peoples attention with the buffoonary in order to make the money to be able to do real film. Movies do not reflect real life because real life doesn't usually have a happy ending. It was a pleasure to experience.

-Reader

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

Thank you!!! I love my brothers, and I like the clarification you put on this piece of art!

XXX