Thursday, July 09, 2009

Obama on Africa...Typical

I am not surprised President Obama has this position on Africa: Unwilling to say that the affects of colonialism/oppression/destruction is justification for the complexity of Africa. This is the same man who will keep passing legislation to give Israel millions each and every year. The same man who will ignore Haiti's cry. Definitely disappointing coming from him. He is the first black president and he selects NOT to acknowledge that neo-colonialism continues to affect the Continent? (I don't need for him to blame, btw). I am happy we have a black man who appears to be a decent man in the white house - but I have always been leery of all politicians. Especially, when it comes to Africa. He cannot even politically embrace his homeland. Express sympathy for its present condition.

It is amazing that men will sell their souls to be in a leadership position in the United States.

Much respect to Sharpton, Farrakhan, Malcolm, Garvey, Vesey, Turner, and more.

They represent and represented. Barack Obama is what he is when it comes to Africa: a Typical American Politician. That equates to a Jelly-Back. A Coward who can't speak ALL the truths about the Homeland.

What about Africa?

Written by Brian E. Payne. Inspired by my question.

24 comments:

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

That’s why he made his pitch in safe US friendly Ghana… . … try that in Nigeria.

-CW

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Muata responds to CW:

His Kenyan grandma needs to bust him up side the head. LOL!

-Muata

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader CW responds to Muata:

You know she will.. and the rest of the village!

-CW

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader CW responds to Muata:

You know she will.. and the rest of the village!

-CW

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response;

well he is MY president, and i don't see anything heinous in his statements.

at some point in time we all have to stop the blame game, accept the responsibility game and move on. did colonialism cause major PROBLEMS and CONFLICTS for african nations - - most certainly, but colonialism cannot be blamed for continued ignorance.

the raping of women and children, the mutilation of bodies, the greed and corruption that africans are employing against other africans - - in my opinion cannot be laid at the feet of colonialism - - when you know better, you're supposed to do better, and when you don't put the blame where it belongs - - at your own feet!

peace & blessings,

-SM

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Muata responds to SM:

I certainly pointed out that I by know means was I looking for any type of blaming. Acknowledgement is what the African people want and DESIRE.

Personal responsibility and accountability is paramount. Some African nations have horrible policies. JUST LIKE THE UNITED STATES. By the way, the US is the same country that still benefits from colonialism. Is our government implementing legislation to cease this profit. NOPE.

It amazes me that if a WHITE president would have said what half-breed Obama said many of the African Americans would be up in arms. That is fact. But, since the Great Black Hope is in office we black folk get all 'different'. This is too bad. Forget that the struggle is within our borders and abroad. "Short-term memories are indicative of foolishness."

I don't care that Barack is black. THE POLICY TOWARD AFRICA NEEDS TO CHANGE. Too bad a black US president is unwilling to spearhead the change. "Change we can believe in"...Yeah, Right.

Also, why hasn't he said anything about the immigration policy toward Haitians who end up on American soil. They will STILL get sent back and be ripped of the American Dream while others are set-up in the nice comforts of the INS. Finally, why is there a need for Obama to sign the multi-million dollar check to Israel? Even as they tell us that they can care less about our opinions regarding the Palestinian people.

Who da fools?

-Muata

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Muata responds to SM:

I certainly pointed out that I by know means was I looking for any type of blaming. Acknowledgement is what the African people want and DESIRE.

Personal responsibility and accountability is paramount. Some African nations have horrible policies. JUST LIKE THE UNITED STATES. By the way, the US is the same country that still benefits from colonialism. Is our government implementing legislation to cease this profit. NOPE.

It amazes me that if a WHITE president would have said what half-breed Obama said many of the African Americans would be up in arms. That is fact. But, since the Great Black Hope is in office we black folk get all 'different'. This is too bad. Forget that the struggle is within our borders and abroad. "Short-term memories are indicative of foolishness."

I don't care that Barack is black. THE POLICY TOWARD AFRICA NEEDS TO CHANGE. Too bad a black US president is unwilling to spearhead the change. "Change we can believe in"...Yeah, Right.

Also, why hasn't he said anything about the immigration policy toward Haitians who end up on American soil. They will STILL get sent back and be ripped of the American Dream while others are set-up in the nice comforts of the INS. Finally, why is there a need for Obama to sign the multi-million dollar check to Israel? Even as they tell us that they can care less about our opinions regarding the Palestinian people.

Who da fools?

-Muata

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader LS responds to Muata:

Did you just put Sharpton in the same category as Malcolm and Garvey? Cmon!

Lemme ask you this? Do you know what it means to be in politics? Did he blame Africa for all of their problems? No he simply stated that Africa cannot continue to blame colonialism for all of its problems when it's leaders are exploiting their own people right now. Yes there are lingering effects of colonialism but is it my dad's fault entirely if I cheat on my wife and have kids outside of the marraige just because he did it several times or at 31 do I have a burden of responsibility to bear for my actions. Look at the leaders in Nigeria,Ethiopia, Zimbabwe. Tell me how their actions now that hurt their countries people are directly related to colonialism. Nigeria doesn't have to be such an oppressive shady place. They have oi and money, which should mean industry and commerce. But it means small upper class, no middle class and large lower class. Is that Europe or is that the fault of the Nigerians who have had their independence for decades?

Colonialism is not the cause of all Africas' problems. It is certainly a huge scar on the face of the continent that can never be forgotten. Yet just like the SINGER Seal who bears an ugly scar, Africa needs to get over it and be succesful despite and in spite of it all. You call him a decent man then a coward. Which is it? I don't know any decent cowards! Al Sharpton and Garvey? REALLY?

-LS

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Muata responds to LS:

Al Sharpton has been on the front lines. He will not relent. He ain't afraid to voice the TRUTH. He makes the establishment uncomfortable, JUST LIKE Garvey and Malcolm.

I expect for Barack Obama to not throw stones. We one to talk. Right!

His policy toward Africa is cowardly and jelly-backish.

-Muata

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

Question: Who ever said colonialism ended? Matter of fact, we can look right here in our own country and see the effects of colonialism. This country remains colonized as well as compartmentalized. It's evident in the limited thinking that has spread like a plague throughout this country. Our people are separated by religion, by finances, by color of skin, etc. Find the tiniest nuance and black people will fight each other--even to the death.


I agree that Obama is practicing limited thinking, but, again, it is the American way. Too many times we are confronted by those who seem to be out-the-box thinkers, who are really nothing more than the dolls of ventriliquists, having no real voice of their own. Because I work as a communicator for government and have worked a considerable number of years in corporate and private sector, I can say that the majority of speeches are not written by the person making them. Many times, the speech doesn't hit their hands until it's almost time to confront the audience. What does happen is that it passes through a multitude of hands who add their own feelings, opinions and directives. And depending on who these hands belong to, the speaker is not apt to make any changes without their express permission.


If we say we are free thinkers, we must be willing to look at incidents and concepts from all sides of the coin, not just the one that makes us feel better. Black people are the least critical of other black people in "power" positions. We are also the least likely to hold these people accountable, for fear they might seem incompetent or corrupt, which sometimes they usually are. And when we do get upset, it's usually short term and nothing major comes of it. Am I wrong?


And like you said, B, we would have been raising hell had a non-person-of-color said this. While there might be a sliver of truth (by the way, truth does not have to make sense, only fiction does) to what Obama said, it does nothing to squash the fact that colonialism is what helped shape Africa into its current declining state. If we look at the current African leadership, the majority operate according to european interests because they depend on european funding, when they already have the needed resources in their country. These are the betrayers of the people, of Africans on the continent and abroad. Unless we get rid of them, the system of neocolonialism will continue and Africa will continue to face the problems she faces.


We cannot afford to take the approach of "I have mine, you get yours," or "I know better and do better, so should you." This is strictly American individualistic thinking AND for this to happen in Africa, all european and other foreign interests would have to be expelled from the country and Africans would have to take their proper place in the context of Africa's resources--that would mean being the powers over these resources, of which they currently are not. Also, all African leadership that supports european and foreign interests, to the detriment of Africans, would have to be toppled and destroyed. In other words, Africans would have to go to war, in the physical sense, because that is the only way these corrupt influences will leave the continent of Africa, a land rich in more natural minerals and resources than any other continent.


Lastly, we can say those who know better are supposed to do better, but who's telling them? On what basis are they to know better? Certainly not looking at their brothers and sisters in America who are just as brainwashed and who have been hoodwinked, bamboozled and led astray for almost as long as they have.

Peace to all . . .

-NAY

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader NAY responds to Muata:

Now, Muata, you were wrong for putting Sharpton, and even Farrakhan, in the same category with Malcolm and Garvey. Day and night, my brother, day and night. ;-) And I find myself, surprisingly (lol), agreeing with Larikus. Africans (in America and abroad) will have to rise up and expel/squash/destroy/incapacitate those who do not work in their best interests, especially and including other Africans. Because they were indoctrinated through colonialism doesn't mean they have to continue its practices.

-NAY

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader SM responds:

i believe president obama has been in office for a little less than 6 mos. while it would be wonderful if he could wave a wand and make everything right at once for everyone, it ain't gonna happen. i feel the man has hit the ground running and while at the end of the day (the end or his term, whether it be one or two) i may agree that he has not accomplished what he campaigned on or what i would like to see in this country, i'm willing to wait (at least a year) and see what he does as opposed to calling him out on what he hasn't done, yet.

AND, i would feel the same way if our president was white, hit the ground running as president obama has and shown the same type of character as i feel president obama has.

president obama is a man, not a great black, white or "half-breed" hope. i do believe him to be an evolved man, which will hopefully make him a "better" steward of our politics.

also, i still do not understand the concept of negatively labeling others who disagree with you during a discussion. :-)

-SM

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader NAY responds to SM:

With any leadership, it has to be clear from the start what the expectations are. Just as in a job, where individuals are evaluated over a certain length of time, it behooves the evaluator and the person being evaluated to ensure that, at all times, the one being evaluated is working according to the conditions spelled out and that the one being evaluated notifies the evaluator when problems arise that prevent the one being evaluated from meeting their STATED goals and objectives. That would mean, no matter how long Obama has been in office, there should be some degree of measurement as to how he is accomplishing the goals set forth and what setbacks he might be encountering. But that would only be applicable if black people had given him expected outcomes in the first place, instead of just being elated that a black man was running for president of a snake organization. I guess I digress.
;-)

-NAY

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

NAY responds to Muata:

The status quo knows that Sharpton is simply a lot of talk. They also know that Sharpton will never roundup Black folks to really take on the establishment. He's safe; just like Jesse. That's why they give him TV time. That's why he gets radio time. It keeps him in check--and it works for the status quo. That's not to condemn Sharpton, because he may very well have the best interests of Black people at heart. But I do know this, all the talking in the world won't change the status of Black people, especially when folks like Sharpton are always announcing our every move. Matter of fact, it's time Black people stop talking so much, generally speaking, and start doing. When we don't like something, let's work together to change it. That, of course, would require real work--and we can't get much done if we're always talking. ;-)

-NAY

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

I for one don't feel compelled to defend Barack on this one. He is dead wrong and I disagree with him. But isn't that what it is all about? I voted for him and supported him and still do, but Brian makes good points. Why can't there be uneasiness? Israel treats Palestinians like dogs (reminiscent of Apartheid and Jim Crow) and we pay millions of our TAX dollars to keep them free to screw with people. Haitians are still sent back (Clinton never lifted a finger on this one either) when they come here but Cubans are free to come as they wish. Why? Racism and a grudge against Castro. It is a bit uneven.

But in regard to Africa, has slavery had a negative affect on African Americans? If you answered yes, then please look up a definition of colonialism. The legacy of colonialism is very much a problem in Africa because the colonial attitude the west has is a buy product of it. Just as a racist attitude in America can find its own origins in the institute of slavery (slavery came out of colonialism by the way). Why can't colonialism keep on catching blame because it was truly barbaric. Why are black people always the ones that have to forget about things and turn the other cheek? I agree that there are governance and corruption in Africa but did Barack mention that a good number of post colonial African leaders with good intentions were killed or deposed in western conspiracies? Patrice Lumumba, Thomas Sankara to name two? Did he mention that if you got to close to Russia as an African leader or if you refused to pay "tribute" to former colonial powers you would end up like the men I just mentioned? Dead or in exile! All this is part and parcel to colonialism, a practice that for some people only ended less than 50 years ago. Anti colonial fighters here are called patriots, in Barack Obama's ancestral home the british called them animals and niggers (If Thurgood Marshall was there you could ask him, he helped write the post colonial Kenyan constitution and the british tried there damndest to keep him out)

Colonialism and slavery (as African Americans know it) did major damage. Trying to act like it is a non issue is a bit irresponsible in my opinion because those folks have a right to feel how they feel about it. Sometimes so called "tough talk" does not need to be made in mixed company. Making a statement like that is grandstanding and it makes him sound like Ronald Reagan in the 80's when he spoke about Africa. That is the absolute last thing in the world I want to come to mind when thinking of Barack man, come on. Every little thing he does is not supposed to be right for all of us "just because" is it?

-LE

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader NAY responds to LE:

*applause* Well said! *continue applause*

-NAY

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

Africa and African people all over the world must unite to defeat our oppressors. As has already been stated neo-colonialism is alive and kicking. It along with its mother capitalism has been controlling the destiny of the African for too many years to count. Why must we unify, Kwame Nkrumah one of the great Pan-Africanists said that Ghanan's independence is meaningless without the total independence of the entire continent. His Pan-African vision in 1957 spoke directly to the need for Africans to control their land and resources both politically and economically.

Today we still don't control out natural resourcesm. However, the gold, boxite, diamonds, copper and oil that is pillaged everyday from Africa is controlled by folks like the opemheimers, debeers, etc. Controlling our resources bioth material and immaterial will give us the power to control our destiny and make sure our people are eating and are not living on less then one dollar a day as some African women are doing as we speak.

Not to mention that every African country is in debt to the world bank and the international monetary fund because they are generally exporting one to two cash crops and importing food. Yet another system set up the colonialists. History has shown us that there is not one group of people who have been oppressed by another and have not had to fight for their freedom. After all we need to change the thought that this capitalist system will ever include the interests of Africans. The very nature of capitalism is built on the premise that a few will exploit the many for a profit. This is not new news to obama he is just part of the system that is oppressing the masses.

The problem in the overall African community is that we have become part and parcel of capitilism or so we think. We need to change our ideology and realize that capitalism is not working for the masses and do something about. It is all of our jobs to liberate Africa and ourselves from this oppression.

We can start by reading a book about our history and changing our ideology. But let's face it folks.

-MF

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

I'm not surprised, either. Obama is just about as mainstream as it gets on a lot of matters. He's bought into the "American way of life hook," line and sinker. He called Rev. Wright and those of us who are skeptical/critical of white America "embittered" and out of touch with the times.

Yeah, right.

He's half-white and was raised by a white woman. His experiences, growing up, those who raised and nurtured him? Far different from those of most African-Americans (which he isn't, despite his somewhat misguided usurpation of the term; he's a Kenyan-American) -- and, certainly, his upbringing would seem utterly alien/foreign to black folks on the Continent.

Yes, Obama is my brother. Like many African-Americans (and others), I voted for the man, donated money, and went to Virginia to work for his election on Election Day. He's a welcome change from Dubya, and there are things he's doing I like/appreciate. But what I do not like is his habitual neglect of black issues, his ridiculously naive/disingenuous assertion vis-a-vis the economy that a rising tide lifts all boats -- that chronically and profoundly economically marginalized black and brown communities don't need targeted (or at least tailored) assistance/attention.

These things are part of Obama's modus operandi. He embraced his Africanness from time to time, in venues where it served his purposes, during his election bid. Now that he's in the White House, he can't distance himself far enough from our issues and concerns. Like a lot of mulattos, he eagerly embraces/appropriates the "hipness"/coolness of A-A culture [joking w/Michael Steele about being "in the hizzy (house)"], but when the flabby rubber of political expediency meets the rocky road of policy priorities/initiatives, he's virtually indistinguishable from any other middle-of-the-road, white politician. His repeated refusal to send a representative to the UN Conference on Racism (despite two days of nonstop e-mails and phone calls organized by the TransAfrica Forum) is a case in point. How on EARTH can we have the first black president -- who deemed the issue so important during the campaign, that he dedicated his Philadelphia address to it -- not send a representative to a UN conference on racism?

Must Africans stand up and take control of their public institutions and governments and demand greater democracy, accountability, greater freedoms and an end to corruption and incompetence? Most assuredly. I can't fault him for stating that. What I can, and will, fault him for is if he fails to address forcefully the history of Western underdevelopment/exploitation of the African continent, its legacy of colonialism, neocolonialism, racism; and using it as a proxy battleground/killing field for Cold War conflicts, even while later sucking up to the former USSR and extolling the virtues of perestroika (America is particularly guilty in this regard); destabilizing legitimate governments that challenged Western militarism/economic domination and sought to establish an indigenous hegemony/autonomy; using Africans (even children) as guinea pigs in sometimes unauthorized and dangerous drug trials, its land and waters as dumping grounds for toxic waste -- and what the West must do to make amends/help set things right.

That Obama would take the African people to the woodshed a la his public rebuke of Rev. Wright is no surprise. Let's see if he has the candor, political focus, integrity and intestinal fortitude to speak equally forcefully to the other important players in Africa's future as well.

The truth is Obama is red-white-and-blue through and through -- not red-black-and-green. He's bought into the myth of America. He actually believes his own rhetoric.

And I find that more than a little scary.

What's even scarier? African-Americans so far are sitting on their hands and giving him a free pass.

-KW

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

1. Obama is playing spook that sat inside the door and realizes that he must distance himself from any hint that he is supporting the interests of black people, in order to maintain his position, secure funding and support for our interests.. all the while supporting and promoting policies that, while not overtly or immediately recognized as benefiting the community, will do so in the long run.... or become recognized by those who feel their lifestyles/opportunities for advancement improve... Many people have this opinion and would rather have hope that this is the case, waiting for a little more time for evidence to label him one way or another... In the meantime they are cutting the brother some slack and assuming the best rather than the worst...

2. Obama is a stereotypical negro.. and once fully realized by his supporters, will result in disillusioned negroes waking up a bit and likely supporting positions, policies, groups/organizations that serve the community interest in retaliation... or finally in self preservation...

I see this as a win win

-K

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Muata responds to KW and K:

I really was not looking for folk to agree with/co-sign me...BUT I am so thankful that there are black folk out there who are thinking along my line of thought. It is refreshing. Not, that I am looking to bash our President. Nope. I pushed his 'focus group' message (playing people's emotions), donated to his campaign, was prepared to slap a white man who disrespected him in word one day, and then I voted for him. I have expectations, and they are not being met. Yes, he is only seven months in; and I did not expect much in this limited time. However, I NEVER believed he would not make an appropriate acknowledgement about the affects of colonialism. And, then for him to basically say, 'get over it Africans', has brought on a different perspective of him for me. Not that I ever thought he was a DOWN FOR THE CAUSE brotha. Nope, never did. This has sealed the deal for me: I am done with him. Will still be proud of him (the accomplishments). However, he is in the PUNK-AZZ POLITICIAN category now...I pray he does some THINGS to get out.

Also, my frustration with black folk has intensified as a result of President Obama's statement. These NEGROES would be up in arms if a white man, any white man with status, would have made that statement. They would be issuing letters of petitions, email campaigns, requesting for an apology, and all the other crap they do when an 'offensive' is made. This type of non-response is what I have titled, Reckless Black Hypocrisy. I am tired of this: Supportive at all cost. Tight-lipped. When a pop cultured well-liked Negro does something that is blatantly ridiculous. Barack Obama slapped the Africans in the face in their own home. Typical of a disrespectful Rush/Sean type.

I said it. We said.

-Muata

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response

Valid points on both sides. Brian I lam leaning with your perspective. Imagine the 5th generation of a family that has suffered from physical abuse and rape receiving a message to basically "be accountable for their psychological make up and move on" by someone who has their blood within him yet has not been on the scene and endured all the affects of the environment. Also, Obama does not get a pass from expectations. He should be held accountable. It comes with the job. He is a POLITICIAN........................................They all play the same game!

-PM

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Responds to PM:

PM,
I have had more than one African to tell me to get over slavery and move past it and that we dwell on it too much and make it as excuses to why some of us are oppressed. I feel he is trying to make them be a little more accountable for their situation. He aint saying it don't exist.

-KH

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

PM responds to KH:

The key word in your message is "feel". We all have them. At the same time, we must acknowledge everyone elses. I'm also an Obama supporter yet I don't allow my feelings to get so emotional that it pisses me off for someone to question him. A lot of black people that I know are allowing their feelings to override their logic with respect to Politics. The man means well yet he chose and is playing a Political game....................Usually that game is to survive and hope to make a positive impact along the way. Obama FANATICS often times are irritating because they tend not to look at reality and acknowledge that he is to be held to the same standards as every other politician.

-PM

Muata, The Shadow, The Black Rebel said...

Reader Response:

Have to agree with Larikus on this one for the one statement that says it all.... I spoke to one of my friends from Africa to ask his take on it and he agrees with President Obama. In his words, Africa is a rich continent but a lot of it's leaders are corrupt and oppress their own people. I also agree with Larikus in that Colonialism is not the cause of all of Africa's problems. No one ever said that the continent hasn't been taken advantage of and victimized but what he is saying is that They (African's) have to take some responsibility for the part that they have played in their plight. I applaud the man for having the balls to say this because most wouldn't dare say it. I'm a believer in that you should take responsibility for your own actions. This doesn't mean that I don't think the continent hasn't been raped before but 2 wrongs don't make a right.
In any event, sorry for the late response but been out all week and wanted to chime in.

-DM